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Research On Biological Clocks Wins Nobel Prize In Medicine04:26
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In this Sept. 24, 2013 photo provided by The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Michael W. Young, right, speaks during a lecture at Shaw College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong with  Jeffrey C. Hall, left, and Michael Rosbash. The three Americans won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, for their discoveries about the body's daily rhythms, opening up whole new fields of research and raising awareness about the importance of getting proper sleep. (The Chinese University of Hong Kong via AP)
In this Sept. 24, 2013 photo provided by The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Michael W. Young, right, speaks during a lecture at Shaw College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong with Jeffrey C. Hall, left, and Michael Rosbash. The three Americans won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, for their discoveries about the body's daily rhythms, opening up whole new fields of research and raising awareness about the importance of getting proper sleep. (The Chinese University of Hong Kong via AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Three researchers whose work illuminates the biological rhythm of living cells have won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young won "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm."

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with David Clapham, professor of neurobiology and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, about the award-winning research.

This segment aired on October 2, 2017.

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