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Pioneers Of High-Resolution Molecular Imaging Win Nobel Prize In Chemistry05:32
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Richard Henderson, one of the 2017 Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, speaks during a press conference beside director Sir Hugh Pellham at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. (Frank Augstein/AP)
Richard Henderson, one of the 2017 Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, speaks during a press conference beside director Sir Hugh Pellham at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. (Frank Augstein/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to three researchers for their work on a groundbreaking method for imaging complex molecules. The scientists helped develop new ways to study tiny cellular structures, proteins and viruses in fine detail.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson discusses the award with Eva Nogales, a professor of biochemistry, biophysics and structural biology at the University of California Berkeley.

This segment aired on October 4, 2017.

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