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Salmon Decline In Northern California Is Bad News For Yurok Tribe06:07
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Jerome Nick Jr. of the Yurok Tribal Fisheries Department checks a net set a couple hours earlier. “No fish.” (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)
Jerome Nick Jr. of the Yurok Tribal Fisheries Department checks a net set a couple hours earlier. “No fish.” (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)
This article is more than 3 years old.

The Yurok Tribe in northwest California has lived along and fished the Klamath River for centuries. Salmon is integral to their culture and way of life — essential to ceremonies for food, and for income.

But this fall, the number of chinook salmon making their way from the ocean up the Klamath is the lowest on record. Lisa Morehouse (@cafoodways) from KQED reports.

More Photos

At the 55th Annual Yurok Salmon Festival, Oscar Gensaw cooks salmon the traditional way, on redwood skewers around a fire pit. This year, though, the tribe had to purchase salmon from Alaska. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)
At the 55th Annual Yurok Salmon Festival, Oscar Gensaw cooks salmon the traditional way, on redwood skewers around a fire pit. This year, though, the tribe had to purchase salmon from Alaska. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)
Yurok Salmon Festival parade. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)
Yurok Salmon Festival parade. (Lisa Morehouse/KQED)

This piece is part of the series California Foodways and was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit, investigative news organization.

This segment aired on October 27, 2017.

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