The History Of Saying 'I'm Sorry' In The U.S.09:29
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Rep. Wilbur D. Mills (D-Ark.), stands with exotic dancer Fanne Foxe, also known as "The Washington Tidal Basin Bombshell," after one of her late-night performances in Boston on Dec. 2, 1974. (AP Photo)
Rep. Wilbur D. Mills (D-Ark.), stands with exotic dancer Fanne Foxe, also known as "The Washington Tidal Basin Bombshell," after one of her late-night performances in Boston on Dec. 2, 1974. (AP Photo)
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As more men stand accused of sexual misconduct, many are watching for two words: "I'm sorry." But, according to historians Joanne Freeman (@jbf1755) and Brian Balogh (@historyfellow), the public apology is not America's strong suit.

From Secretary of State Alexander Hamilton to President Grover Cleveland to Justice Clarence Thomas, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson explores that history with Balogh and Freeman, co-hosts of the podcast BackStory, which is produced at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

This segment aired on December 8, 2017.

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