Tax Overhaul Reignites Alaska's Indigenous Debate Over Oil Drilling10:56
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This undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. President Trump’s proposed budget calls for opening the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
This undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. President Trump’s proposed budget calls for opening the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

The GOP tax overhaul includes a plan to raise revenue by allowing oil and gas drilling within parts of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, or ANWR, the largest wilderness area in the United States. The debate over whether to drill in ANWR has divided the indigenous tribes that live and work on the land.

Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with Bernadette Demientieff, a member of the Gwich'in nation and executive director of the Gwich'in Steering Committee, which opposes drilling. He also hears from Matthew Rexford, president of Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation, who says drilling revenue can help his people.

This segment aired on December 20, 2017.

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