From Canada To France To Australia, Political Shifts Put Climate Action On Thin Ice10:09
Download

Play
Steam and exhaust rise from a power plant on Jan. 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany. According to a report released by the European Copernicus Climate Change Service, 2016 is likely to have been the hottest year since global temperatures were recorded in the 19th century. (Lukas Schulze/Getty Images)
Steam and exhaust rise from a power plant on Jan. 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany. According to a report released by the European Copernicus Climate Change Service, 2016 is likely to have been the hottest year since global temperatures were recorded in the 19th century. (Lukas Schulze/Getty Images)
This article is more than 1 year old.

Australia signed a pact with its Pacific neighbors Wednesday declaring climate change the single biggest threat to the region, and reaffirming its commitment to the Paris climate agreement. But Australia is one of many developed nations where a political shift to the right has slowed climate action since that agreement was signed in 2015.

Here & Now's Lisa Mullins speaks with Robinson Meyer (@yayitsrob), staff writer at The Atlantic.

This segment aired on September 6, 2018.

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news