Can You Be Addicted To Hate? White Supremacy Researchers Say 'Yes'09:36
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Hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis, KKK and members of the alt-right hurl water bottles back and forth against counter demonstrators on the outskirts of Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis, KKK and members of the alt-right hurl water bottles back and forth against counter demonstrators on the outskirts of Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Fox News host Tucker Carlson recently called white supremacy a hoax and a conspiracy theory, which unleashed a storm of criticism from news outlets and researchers who say it's anything but.

In fact, some say it's not only real, but can become an addiction for some, making it hard to leave and to avoid relapse once they've left.

Among those is Dr. Peter Simi, a professor of sociology at Chapman University in Orange, California. He's spent the last two decades studying white supremacy and is lead author on the paper "Addicted to Hate: Identity Residual Among Former White Supremacists." He joins host Robin Young to discuss what is known about addiction to hate groups and how those trying to leave can cope.

This segment aired on August 15, 2019.

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