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Oswego's History Provides A Lesson In Hospitality03:35
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Oswego residents talking to the refugees at Fort Ontario. (Photo courtesy of Beit Hatfutsut Museum/Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum)
Oswego residents talking to the refugees at Fort Ontario. (Photo courtesy of Beit Hatfutsut Museum/Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Earlier this month, an event took place in Oswego, New York. It was a reunion — perhaps the last — of a group of Jewish Holocaust refugees who were children when they were brought to the city.

Oswego was the only place in the U.S. to serve as a camp for this group. As Payne Horning from member station WRVO reports, the legacy of their story is still relevant today.

Hundreds of people came to celebrate the 75th anniversary of when refugees from Europe fled World War II to live in safety at Fort Ontario in Oswego. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)
75th anniversary reunion in Oswego. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)
Bruno Kaiser, a refugee who was 16 when he arrived in Oswego. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)
Bruno Kaiser, a refugee who was 16 when he arrived in Oswego. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)
An Oswego refugee's headstone. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)
An Oswego refugee's headstone. (Payne Horning/WRVO News)

This segment aired on August 30, 2019.

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