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Abortion Rights Advocates Worry About Future Of Roe V. Wade After Supreme Court Allows Texas Law05:55
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A pro-abortion rights activist (center) demonstrates in the middle of anti-abortion activists as they demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court during the March For Life in Washington, D.C., in January 2017. At least half of all states in the U.S. have imposed restrictions on abortion in the decades following Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision recognizing a woman's right to abortion, according to the Guttmacher Institute. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
A pro-abortion rights activist (center) demonstrates in the middle of anti-abortion activists as they demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court during the March For Life in Washington, D.C., in January 2017. At least half of all states in the U.S. have imposed restrictions on abortion in the decades following Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision recognizing a woman's right to abortion, according to the Guttmacher Institute. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Abortion rights advocates worry that Supreme Court ruling could signal the beginning of the end for Roe v. Wade

The U.S. Supreme Court late Wednesday night allowed a Texas law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy to go into effect, but said that reproductive rights groups could still bring their challenge to the law back to the high court at a later time.

But the 5-4 decision has abortion rights advocates worried that Roe v. Wade may be in jeopardy.

Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks with Emily Bazelon, senior research scholar at Yale Law School and staff writer for The New York Times Magazine

This segment aired on September 2, 2021.

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