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Hurricane Harvey Devastated Texas In 2017. 4 Years Later, Is The State Better Prepared?05:19
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Damage from Tropical Depression Nicholas on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in San Luis Pass, Texas. (David J. Phillip/AP)
Damage from Tropical Depression Nicholas on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in San Luis Pass, Texas. (David J. Phillip/AP)

Tropical Depression Nicholas made landfall near Houston this week and took out power for more than half a million residents. And right now in Texas, more than 6 million people are under flash flood alerts.

The storm comes four years after Hurricane Harvey wreaked havoc across Texas' infrastructure.

Jim Blackburn, an environmental law professor at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy, tells host Tonya Mosley more about how Texas' flood preparedness and a future under climate change.

Flooded homes are shown near Lake Houston following Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Flooded homes are shown near Lake Houston following Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
A Houston resident walks through waist deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston, Aug. 29, 2017. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
A Houston resident walks through waist deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston, Aug. 29, 2017. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

This segment aired on September 15, 2021.

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