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Western drought: What individuals can do to help06:03
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A section of Lake Oroville is seen nearly dry on August 19, 2014 in Oroville, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A section of Lake Oroville is seen nearly dry on August 19, 2014 in Oroville, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A few months ago, the water outlook in the West seemed to be improving. During the snowiest December on record, more than 200 inches of snow fell on the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California.

But drought restrictions are being expanded in the state — and scientists say the West can expect another blistering wildfire season.

For how things look and what we can do about it, as the planet suffers the impacts of extreme climate change, host Anthony Brooks speaks with Andrew Schwartz, manager and lead scientist at the University of California Berkeley Central Sierra Snow Lab.

Editor's note: The audio and original web blurb for this segment incorrectly state that "the drought is back." The web blurb has been corrected. 

This segment aired on April 13, 2022.

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