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After a series of devastating hurricanes, Georgians prepare for future storms04:56
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Larry and Donna Pipers’ house on Tybee Island now stands 11 feet above the ground, hopefully high enough to keep it out of future floods. (Emily Jones/WABE)
Larry and Donna Pipers’ house on Tybee Island now stands 11 feet above the ground, hopefully high enough to keep it out of future floods. (Emily Jones/WABE)

As hurricane season approaches, some Georgians are still feeling the impact of storms that have pummeled the state in the last few years.

Many communities are shoring up homes and infrastructure in preparation for future storms.

Emily Jones of WABE reports.

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with WABE and Grist, a nonprofit, independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

Southwest Georgia pecan trees were torn down by Hurricane Michael in 2018. Because they take about 10 years to mature, farmer Eric Cohen decided not to replant. (Eric Cohen)
Southwest Georgia pecan trees were torn down by Hurricane Michael in 2018. Because they take about 10 years to mature, farmer Eric Cohen decided not to replant. (Eric Cohen)

This segment aired on May 25, 2022.

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