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Students Start 50-Mile Trek To Smith & Wesson For Gun Control

Jack Torres, 16, a Somerville, Mass., high school student, center, raises his arms while walking in a planned 50-mile march, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018, in Worcester, Mass. The march, held to call for gun law reforms, began Thursday, in Worcester, and is scheduled to end Sunday, Aug. 26, in Springfield, Mass., at the headquarters of gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Jack Torres, 16, a Somerville, Mass., high school student, center, raises his arms while walking in a planned 50-mile march, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018, in Worcester, Mass. The march, held to call for gun law reforms, began Thursday, in Worcester, and is scheduled to end Sunday, Aug. 26, in Springfield, Mass., at the headquarters of gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
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Students in Massachusetts have set off on a 50-mile march to Smith & Wesson's headquarters to call for stricter gun control.

About 40 students and supporters started walking Thursday morning from Worcester City Hall. They're expected to arrive at the gun maker's Springfield office Sunday for a large demonstration.

They're demanding, among other things, that the company contribute $5 million to gun violence research.

David Hogg, a survivor of February's massacre at a high school in Parkland, Florida, was among Thursday's marchers. He stressed the importance of turning the energy of nationwide demonstrations into political change in elections.

David Hogg, center, a survivor of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., walks in a planned 50-mile march in Worcester, Mass. (Steven Senne/AP)
David Hogg, center, a survivor of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., walks in a planned 50-mile march in Worcester, Mass. (Steven Senne/AP)

Manuel and Patricia Oliver, parents of a Parkland shooting victim who also joined marchers, criticized Smith & Wesson for making the weapon that killed their son and 16 others.

Manuel Oliver, center, and his wife Patricia, right, parents of slain Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school student Joaquin Oliver, walk in Worcester. (Steven Senne/AP)
Manuel Oliver, center, and his wife Patricia, right, parents of slain Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school student Joaquin Oliver, walk in Worcester. (Steven Senne/AP)

Company spokespersons didn't comment this week.

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