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The direct action of ACT UP helped end AIDS. Here's what it can teach us in 202247:51
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ACT UP's direct action spread awareness about AIDS in the late 1980s. In this photo from 2004, ACT UP protesters are gathered in Washington, DC. (TIM SLOAN/AFP via Getty Images)
ACT UP's direct action spread awareness about AIDS in the late 1980s. In this photo from 2004, ACT UP protesters are gathered in Washington, DC. (TIM SLOAN/AFP via Getty Images)

Sam revisits his 2021 conversation with Sarah Schulman about ACT UP. The organization united a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. In Schulman's book, Let The Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, she draws from nearly 200 interviews with ACT UP members to document the movement's history and explore how the group's activism transformed the way the media, the government, corporations and medical professionals talked about AIDS and provided treatment. Schulman and Sam discuss this transformation and its relevance to social movements today.

Copyright NPR 2022.

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