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A policeman examines some of the ten school buses destroyed by fire and dynamite in late Aug. 30, 1971, just days before a court-ordered plan to desegregate schools in Pontiac, Michigan, by busing children went into effect. Five members of the Ku Klux Klan were later convicted of the bombing plot. (Bettmann/Bettmann Archive)
A policeman examines some of the ten school buses destroyed by fire and dynamite in late Aug. 30, 1971, just days before a court-ordered plan to desegregate schools in Pontiac, Michigan, by busing children went into effect. Five members of the Ku Klux Klan were later convicted of the bombing plot. (Bettmann/Bettmann Archive)

After the landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, public schools across the country were supposed to become more integrated, but by the 1970s, many weren't. As a way to remedy segregation in their city, the Detroit school board introduced busing across Detroit. But the plan was met with so much resistance that the issue eventually led all the way to the Supreme Court.

This week, segregation in Detroit public schools and the impact of a Supreme Court case that went far beyond that city.


If you would like to read more on the topic, here's a list:


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Photos: Default list title

A policeman examines some of the ten school buses destroyed by fire and dynamite in late Aug. 30, 1971, just days before a court-ordered plan to desegregate schools in Pontiac, Michigan, by busing children went into effect. Five members of the Ku Klux Klan were later convicted of the bombing plot. (Bettmann/Bettmann Archive)
Irene McCabe addresses an anti-busing rally at the base of the Washington Monument after her march from Michigan to the Capitol to protest forced school busing, April 27, 1972. (John Duricka/AP)
A police on guard as Boston begins a school busing program on September 12, 1974, to integrate Boston Public Schools under a court order. (PBR/AP)
A crowd watches as a bus carrying students returns to Columbia Point with broken windows on September 12, 1974, the first day of school under the new busing system. The system was met with strong resistance from many residents of Boston neighborhoods. (Don Preston/Getty Images)

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