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Latest Show: Auto Racing Dangers, Fixing Ballgames, NYC Hoops49:46
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Between 1966 and 1975, one in three Formula One and professional auto racing drivers died. So why did Brian Redman keep driving? (Michael Keyser)
Between 1966 and 1975, one in three Formula One and professional auto racing drivers died. So why did Brian Redman keep driving? (Michael Keyser)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Brian Redman left school at 16 and found a career in auto racing during the sport's most deadly decade. This week on Only A Game, Redman tells a story about love in the face of injuries, accidents and brushes with death. Plus, the name "Hal Chase" probably doesn't come to mind when you think of baseball's infamous fixers, but maybe it should. And why do New Yorkers play a different style of basketball from everyone else? Join us!

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'Prince' Hal Chase: 'The Babe Ruth Of Ballgame Fixers'

Hal Chase belongs on the list of baseball's most infamous game fixers.

3 Stories: MLB Advertising, Thursday Night Football, EU Rules On Sports

Craig Calcaterra of NBC Sports and Charlotte Wilder of SB Nation join Bill Littlefield.

Brian Redman Remembers Racing's Deadliest Decade

One-third of auto racing's top drivers died between 1966-1975. Brian Redman survived.

Charlie Pierce: The Week In Sports

Bill Littlefield and Charlie Pierce discuss Game 2 of the 2017 Word Series and other sports news.

Messed-Up Rims And 'Magic': The Story Behind The NYC Style Of Basketball

Players from New York City have a unique style. But could it be hurting their NBA chances?

This program aired on October 28, 2017.

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