Support the news

Obama in Russia45:21
Download

Play
This article is more than 10 years old.
President Barack Obama and Russia's President Dmitry Medvedev sign a preliminary agreement to reduce the world's two largest nuclear stockpiles by as much as a third, to the lowest levels of any U.S.-Russia accord, before a joint news conference at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday, July 6, 2009. (AP)
President Barack Obama and Russia's President Dmitry Medvedev sign a preliminary agreement to reduce the world's two largest nuclear stockpiles by as much as a third, to the lowest levels of any U.S.-Russia accord, before a joint news conference at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday, July 6, 2009. (AP)

Last summer, it was all but proxy war between the United States and Russia. Russian troops in neighboring Georgia. Washington’s rhetoric on fire.
This summer, it’s Barack Obama in Moscow, talking about a new beginning in U.S.-Russia ties. He talked with Medvedev. Talked with Putin. He got the start of a nuclear arms deal. He got over-flight rights for the U.S. military to Afghanistan.
But as for a real restart, a reset — not so clear. There are tough issues here with a defiant, oil-rich Russia.
This hour, On Point: Zbigniew Brzezinski, and more, on Obama in Moscow and the push for a reset with Russia.
You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

From Moscow we're joined by Karen Travers, White House reporter for ABC News. She's been traveling with President Obama in Russia and covered his speech today and the arms agreement signed yesterday.

From Washington, we're joined by Zbigniew Brzezinski, national security advisor under President Jimmy Carter, from 1977 to 1981, and now a professor of American foreign policy at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies and a trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

And joining us from New York is Stephen Cohen, professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University and a contributing editor to The Nation.  His most recent book is "Soviet Fates and Lost Alternatives."

This program aired on July 7, 2009.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news