Support the news

Iran After the Crackdown24:21
Download

Play
This article is more than 10 years old.
In a photo released by the semi-official Iranian Fars News Agency, an unidentified defendant speaks in a court room in Tehran, Iran, on Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009. On Sunday, Iran put 25 more activists and opposition supporters on trial for their alleged involvement in the post-election turmoil. (AP/Fars News Agency)
In a photo released by the semi-official Iranian Fars News Agency, an unidentified defendant speaks in a court room in Tehran, Iran, on Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009. On Sunday, Iran put 25 more activists and opposition supporters on trial for their alleged involvement in the post-election turmoil. (AP/Fars News Agency)

The whole world was watching in June as giant crowds poured into the streets of Iran to protest what they cried was a blatantly stolen presidential election.
Then came crackdown in the streets — and worse for those swept up and imprisoned.
Tehran has been rocked by allegations of rape and torture — "Worse than Abu Ghraib," has been the critique from within. By mass trials, with threats of more to come. And a boiling standoff among elites now about the way ahead for the Islamic Republic.
This hour, On Point: Looking through the crackdown in Iran.
You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.

Guests:

Joining us from Beirut, Lebanon, is Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent and Beirut bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times.

From New York, we're joined by Hooman Majd, author of "The Ayatollah Begs to Differ: The Paradox of Modern Iran" (2008). Born in Iran and educated in England and the U.S., his father was a diplomat under the shah and his grandfather was a prominent ayatollah. He reported from Iran in April for Newsweek and remains in contact with people in Iran. He has also written for GQ, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New York Observer, Salon, and the Huffington Post.

This program aired on August 17, 2009.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news