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The Latino Agenda In 201256:35
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With Mike Pesca in for Tom Ashbrook

In advance of the GOP debate in Arizona, we’ll look at what Latinos want in 2012.

In this May 10, 2011, file photo audience members listen to President Barack Obama speak about immigration reform at Chamizal National Memorial Park in El Paso, Texas. A year before the 2012 presidential election, Hispanic voters face a choice: continue to support Obama despite being disproportionately hurt by the economic downturn or turn to Republicans at a time when many GOP presidential hopefuls have taken a hard line on immigration. (AP)
In this May 10, 2011, file photo audience members listen to President Barack Obama speak about immigration reform at Chamizal National Memorial Park in El Paso, Texas. A year before the 2012 presidential election, Hispanic voters face a choice: continue to support Obama despite being disproportionately hurt by the economic downturn or turn to Republicans at a time when many GOP presidential hopefuls have taken a hard line on immigration. (AP)

On the day of the GOP debate in Arizona, immigration is sure to come to the fore. Almost 22 million Latino voters will be eligible to vote in the 2012 presidential election. Hispanic voters have power at the polls. They can turn the election in most swing states this November.

But what’s the Latino agenda?  Immigration reform for sure, almost every Latino voter supports the Dream Act.  But because the federal government under president Obama has deported more than a million immigrants, there is an opening for Republicans.

This hour, On Point Latinos - que quere?
-Mike Pesca

Guests

Alan Gomez, Reporter for USA Today.

Charles Garcia, CEO of Garcia Trujillo, a business focused on the Hispanic market, and the author of "Leadership Lessons of the White House Fellows." A native of the Republic of Panama, he now lives in Florida.

Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, a fellow of the LBJ School of Public Affairs' Center for Politics and Governance at the University of Texas, is the director of communications for Latino Decisions.

Arnoldo Torres, former executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens he is also a commentator for Univision.

From The Reading List

Arizona Republic "Nearly seven weeks since the Iowa caucuses, the GOP race remains far from settled. And although the Republicans have had no shortage of high-profile debates — there have been 25 so far — this week's Arizona event marks the candidates' first joint appearance since Jan. 26. It also is the only debate in the crucial run-up to the Arizona and Michigan primaries Feb. 28."

USA Today "When it comes to Latino voters, Republicans must have un impulso suicida. What else but a death wish could explain the party's treatment of the fastest-growing voting bloc in the nation? First was the wave of Arizona-style immigration laws. Then came the anti-immigrant rhetoric from the GOP presidential candidates. On Tuesday, Senate Republicans roughed up Adalberto Jose Jordan — because, well, just because they could."

Washington Post Writers Group "A few years ago, commentator Patrick Buchanan published a book where he argued that the United States was better off when most of the immigrants to its shores came from Europe and not Africa, Asia, and Latin America."

This program aired on February 22, 2012.

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