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Week In The News: Cruz Wins Iowa, Clinton Edges Sanders, Zika ‘Emergency’46:31
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Ted Cruz, Clinton and Sanders out of Iowa. Zika panic. Syrian peace talks fall apart. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas mingles at a campaign event at Robie's Country Store, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, in Hooksett, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas mingles at a campaign event at Robie's Country Store, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, in Hooksett, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

You could feel the intensity this week, in every corner of the primary campaign. Ted Cruz celebrating his Iowa win. Trump trying to keep cool, then shouting fraud. Clinton claiming her win, but knowing it looked like a tie. With Sanders, throwing down last night over money, influence, smears and what it means to be progressive. And then: Zika, Shkreli, the draft for women, Obama at a mosque.  This hour On Point, our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Kelly O'Donnell, Capitol Hill correspondent for NBC News. (@KellyO)

John McCormack, senior writer for the Weekly Standard. (@McCormackJohn)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. Sign up for his Notes From New Hampshire newsletter here. (@JackBeattyNPR)

From Tom’s Reading List

NBC News: Rubio: I'll Beat Clinton Without Any Coin Flips — "Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida said Tuesday that he's got the momentum after his strong third-place finish in Monday's Iowa caucuses — and wouldn't need a coin flip to beat Hillary Clinton in the general election."

The Weekly Standard: Why Trump Lost Iowa -- "Many analysts assumed that a huge Iowa turnout would mean a Trump blowout. The turnout record on the GOP side was indeed shattered as more than 180,000 Iowans went to the Republican. The previous Republican record was 2012 when about 120,000 voted. What most analysts and pollsters got wrong is that they believed a big turnout would mean an electorate with a smaller percentage of evangelical Christians."

The Wall Street Journal: Rate of Zika-Related Birth Defects in Brazil Uncertain — "Confusion over the scope of microcephaly in Brazil underscores the difficulties of tracking the potentially new effects of a virus in a populous but poor nation like Brazil. WHO officials say they suspect a link between Zika and birth defects in part because Zika has been found in the placenta of at least two confirmed microcephaly cases. But the extent of microcephaly in Brazil remains uncertain."

This program aired on February 5, 2016.

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