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Second Accusation For Kavanaugh And Lessons From Anita Hill17:09
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** FILE**University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in this Oct. 11, 1991 file photo. Thrust briefly back in the spotlight by biting words in Thomas' new book, Hill now is trying to answer this question: Have things gotten better for women in the workplace? (AP Photo/John Duricka, file)
** FILE**University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in this Oct. 11, 1991 file photo. Thrust briefly back in the spotlight by biting words in Thomas' new book, Hill now is trying to answer this question: Have things gotten better for women in the workplace? (AP Photo/John Duricka, file)
This article is more than 3 years old.

With Meghna Chakrabarti

As a second woman accuses Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct, we speak with an investigative reporter who revealed key information about the Thomas-Hill hearings.

Guest

Florence George Graves, founding director of the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University. Author of a Washington Post investigation that revealed bipartisan maneuvering by several Senate Judiciary Committee members to discourage the testimony of a key witness in the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings.

From The Reading List

The Washington Post: "The Other Woman" — "She did not testify because she was not called to testify. Contrary to their public statements, no one in power really wanted her to testify. That's what Angela Wright recalls."

The New Yorker: Senate Democrats Investigate a New Allegation of Sexual Misconduct, from Brett Kavanaugh’s College Years — "The woman at the center of the story, Deborah Ramirez, who is fifty-three, attended Yale with Kavanaugh, where she studied sociology and psychology. Later, she spent years working for an organization that supports victims of domestic violence. The New Yorker contacted Ramirez after learning of her possible involvement in an incident involving Kavanaugh. The allegation was conveyed to Democratic senators by a civil-rights lawyer."

This segment aired on September 24, 2018.

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