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Causes Of Polio-Like AFM — The Disease Paralyzing Children — Still Unknown16:59
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, file photo, a sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, file photo, a sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

With Meghna Chakrabarti

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week reported 155 cases of acute flaccid myelitis under investigation.

Guests

Dr. Benjamin Greenberg, associate professor and the Cain Denius Scholar in Mobility Disorders in the Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Expert in treating rare autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system, and has treated children with AFM.

From The Reading List

USA Today: "Scientists are searching for answers to AFM, the illness causing polio-like paralysis in children" — "Scientists are studying whether the rare but paralyzing illness that has afflicted scores of children this year is linked to a respiratory virus that circulates in late summer and early fall.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week reported 386 cases of acute flaccid myelitis since August 2014. The illness mainly strikes children.

"Cases are exceedingly rare; fewer than one in a million children are affected. But for a small number of children, the results are devastating."

NBC News: "CDC investigating more cases of polio-like syndrome" — "Federal health officials said Monday they now have reports of 155 possible cases of acute flaccid myelitis, a polio-like syndrome that causes muscle weakness and paralysis.

"The latest update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows no change in the number of confirmed cases — 62 cases in 22 states. But state health departments have reported another 28 suspected cases."

This segment aired on October 25, 2018.

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