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In Final Weekend Before Election Day, Trump And Clinton Fiercely Campaign In N.H.04:41
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MANCHESTER, N.H. — With Election Day on Tuesday, the presidential candidates are making their final pitches to voters across the country.

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump — as well as their surrogates — spent a lot of time the past few days in swing-state New Hampshire, which has become one of the key battlegrounds at the end of a long and divisive campaign.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges supporters during a campaign rally on Friday in Atkinson, N.H. (Jim Cole/AP)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges supporters during a campaign rally on Friday in Atkinson, N.H. (Jim Cole/AP)

On Friday, Donald Trump was in Atkinson, telling a small but raucous crowd that Clinton was unfit to be president.

"Hillary has engaged in a massive criminal enterprise and cover-up," he said. "She created an illegal email server to shield her criminal activity and corrupt pay-for-play."

There's no evidence of that, but Trump has feasted on that line of attack for the past 10 days, ever since FBI Director James Comey began probing a newly discovered batch of Clinton emails. That's how the weekend began.

On Sunday night, James Taylor performed at a Clinton rally in Manchester. A few hours before, Comey wrote Congress that the emails apparently contained nothing that would change his conclusion that Clinton should not be prosecuted for the way she handled classified information. It lifted a dark cloud of uncertainty that has hung over Clinton in the final days of her campaign, which prompted Taylor to offer this:

"I mean, they threw everything at her they could think of. But they can't keep her back. They can't keep her down," he said to cheers.

For her part, Clinton didn't mention her emails or Comey's actions so close to Election Day. She did deliver her closing argument, including calls for a higher minimum wage, affordable child care, paid family leave and tuition-free college education for the middle class. And she identified what might be the biggest challenge for the next president.

"We will have some work to do to bring about healing and reconciliation after this election. We have to begin listening to one another and respecting one another," she said.

On Friday, Trump offered his closing argument — including cutting taxes on businesses, spending more on the military, terminating NAFTA, building that wall along the Mexican border and suspending the Syrian refugee program.

"And we will keep radical Islamic terrorists the hell out of our country. Sorry," he said.

As Trump pushed that hard line in Atkinson, Clinton brought Khizr Khan to Manchester. As the father of a Muslim-American soldier killed in Iraq, Khan captivated the Democratic National Convention this past summer with his scathing attack of the Republican nominee. On Sunday night he had questions for Trump.

"Would my son, Capt. Humayun Khan, have a place in your America? Would Muslims have a place in your America? Would anyone who isn't like you have a place in your America, Mr. Trump? Well, thankfully, Mr. Trump, this isn't your America."

Khizr Khan, the father of fallen Army Capt. Humayun Khan, left, introduces Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, during a rally at The Armory at the Radisson Hotel in Manchester, N.H. on Sunday. (Andrew Harnik/AP)
Khizr Khan, the father of fallen Army Capt. Humayun Khan, left, introduces Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, during a rally at The Armory at the Radisson Hotel in Manchester, N.H. on Sunday. (Andrew Harnik/AP)

New Hampshire has become one of the most hotly contested races in this election, its four electoral votes perhaps crucial for Trump if he's to win, while the Clinton campaign sees it as an opportunity to block him.

Trump says he represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for change, and he's counting on the passion of people like Karen Morely, who was in Atkinson on Friday.

"I'm just so happy to be here in person. He's wonderful. It's just about making America safe again and strong," Morely said. "It's just everything he believes in, I believe in. He represents, I think, the majority, so I just hope America gets it right."

And Clinton is counting on voters like Catherine Johnson from Hanover.

"She could quite possibly be the most qualified person to ever run for the presidency. And Donald Trump is like the most unfit person to run," Johnson said. "There is like no gray here at all. It is black and white."

President Obama will be in Durham on Monday to make that case. Trump will return to Manchester Monday for one of his final campaign stops before Election Day.

This segment aired on November 7, 2016.

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Anthony Brooks Twitter Senior Political Reporter
Anthony Brooks is WBUR's senior political reporter.

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