Support the news

New Dads Struggle To Balance Family And Career29:59
Download

Play
This article is more than 8 years old.
Fathers are increasingly struggling with wanting to be more involved as a parent while also wanting to advance in their careers. (Courtesy Creative Commons)
Fathers are increasingly struggling with wanting to be more involved as a parent while also wanting to advance in their careers. (Courtesy Creative Commons)

A new study out of Boston College's Center for Work and Family finds that new fathers are increasingly struggling with wanting to be more involved as a parent while also wanting to advance in their careers.

The study called "The New Dad — Caring, Committed and Conflicted," surveyed 1,000 men nationwide, all new dads who worked as professionals for Fortune 500 companies.

A majority of the new dads — 68 percent — said they want to share in parenting 50-50. At the same time, 76 percent said they wanted to move up in their field and take on more responsibility.

New dads also found that they do better in the workplace and are perceived as being more committed, more mature and more credible employees after they become fathers. Earlier studies have showed that new mothers have a tougher time at work after they give birth, and unlike new dads are less likely to be promoted, and can be considered less committed as employees.

The question is whether fathers and mothers can attempt to balance their desire to advance in their careers while also being active and involved parents. A growing number of couples are trying to construct more equal partnerships despite a culture that enforces traditional roles for the sexes.

Guests:

More:

This segment aired on June 16, 2011.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news