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(sporkist/flickr)
(sporkist/flickr)

Yesterday we spoke with The Boston Globe's Geoff Edgers about the opening of the MFA’s new contemporary art wing. Geoff wondered whether the new wing would be a threat to Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art, and suggested that the ICA has its own niche in edgier, less accessible art.

A listener who commented on our website as Allon wrote to say he doesn't think the ICA goes far enough:

The ICA should be showing work radical enough to send the MFA donors running. Instead, its exhibitions have been conservative to the point of blandness… The only way the ICA will stay relevant is by taking greater curative risks and showing artists that have not already ascended into the cultural canon.

Yesterday's conversation with Judy Norsigean about the 40th anniversary of her seminal feminist book on women's health and sexuality, “Our Body, Ourselves,” prompted this response from Googlemail2003:

I first got this book in the mid 70's while I was living in Pennsylvania. At the time I was married and had a child. Still, I knew nothing about my body and how it should feel when making love. This book taught me who I was and how I could feel. I ended up leaving my husband and moving to Cambridge. I wanted to live in the city that was home to so many of the authors of this book. What better place for a single Mom? What better place for a woman?

We welcome your thoughts, celebrations or criticisms so keep those comments coming.

This program aired on October 18, 2011.

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