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Gun Advocacy Group Pushes 'Stand Your Ground' Law On Beacon Hill09:14
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High School students chant during a rally demanding justice for Trayvon Martin, Friday, in Miami Gardens, Fla. Neighborhood crime-watch captain George Zimmerman claimed self-defense and has not been arrested, though state and federal authorities are still investigating. (AP)
High School students chant during a rally demanding justice for Trayvon Martin, Friday, in Miami Gardens, Fla. Neighborhood crime-watch captain George Zimmerman claimed self-defense and has not been arrested, though state and federal authorities are still investigating. (AP)

The shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old Florida boy by a crime watch volunteer has re-ignited the debate about so-called "stand your ground" laws. Until a few years ago, in all 50 states, the law was straight-forward: if you were threatened, but could safely retreat, you had a duty to do so.

But now, at least 20 states, led by Florida, have passed laws that allow citizens to use deadly force in the face of great bodily injury or death anywhere that they have a lawful right to be.

Here in Massachusetts, there's an effort underway to pass such a law. It's called the "Common Defense Bill," and it's sponsored by State Sen. Stephen Brewer (D-Barre). Brewer's office said he was unavailable to talk to us about the legislation, so instead we talked to Jim Wallace, executive director of the Gun Owners' Action League.

Guest:

This segment aired on March 28, 2012.

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