Support the news

Race And Real Estate In Boston21:28
Download

Play
This article is more than 7 years old.
Kirsten Greenidge took a driving tour through Arlington, Mass, with WBUR's Andrea Shea. Alrington inspired her play "The Luck of the Irish." (Andrea Shea/WBUR)
Kirsten Greenidge took a driving tour through Arlington, Mass, with WBUR's Andrea Shea. Alrington inspired her play "The Luck of the Irish." (Andrea Shea/WBUR)

A few days ago, Anthony had a fascinating interview with Harry and Nancy Johnson, an interracial couple who had to resort to a practice known as "ghost buying" to purchase their home in Brookline.

Ghost Buying was a practice used in and around Boston in the 1950's and 60's. Back then, African American families were frequently denied the right to buy homes in all-white neighborhoods. So they would recruit whites to front for them and help them buy the house.

Last night, we saw a new play about this complicated chapter of Boston history. It's called "The Luck of the Irish," and it's the story of a black family and a white Irish family, and how the spectre of ghost buying haunts both families for 50 years.

We take a closer look at ghost buying and other practices that surround race and real estate in Boston and the rest of the nation.

"The Luck of the Irish" is playing through April 29 at the Huntington Theater.

Guests:

More:

This segment aired on April 6, 2012.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news