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What Is Happening To Bipartisanship?07:10
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In this Jan. 24, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama shakes hands with Sen. Scott Brown on Capitol Hill in Washington, after delivering his State of the Union address. (AP)
In this Jan. 24, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama shakes hands with Sen. Scott Brown on Capitol Hill in Washington, after delivering his State of the Union address. (AP)

There's been a lot of talk these days about the divisive nature of the political process and the toll it's taking on bipartisanship. That's what convinced Sen. Olympia Snow, a moderate Republican from Maine, not to seek re-election.

And last week, long-time Senate Republican Dick Lugar, another moderate, was defeated by Tea Party candidate Richard Mourdock.

So how do we measure bipartisanship? A while back, Congressional Quarterly took a crack at that by analyzing how frequently lawmakers voted with their party or against it. Barney Frank for example? He voted with Democrats 96 percent of the time.

Boston.com politics editor Glen Johnson joins Radio Boston to discuss bipartisanship in Washington.

Guest:

  • Glen Johnson, political editor, Boston.com

This segment aired on May 14, 2012.

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