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Special Senate Election Gets More Interesting14:37
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Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate Gabriel Gomez, right, hugs his daughter Olivia, 13, left, before addressing an audience with a victory speech at a watch party, in Cohasset, Mass., Tuesday, April 30, 2013. Gomez won his primary bid for the Republican nomination to contest a U.S. Senate seat, defeating Republican hopefuls Michael Sullivan and Dan Winslow. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate Gabriel Gomez, right, hugs his daughter Olivia, 13, left, before addressing an audience with a victory speech at a watch party, in Cohasset, Mass., Tuesday, April 30, 2013. Gomez won his primary bid for the Republican nomination to contest a U.S. Senate seat, defeating Republican hopefuls Michael Sullivan and Dan Winslow. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Republican candidate and Cohasset businessman Gabriel Gomez, won the Republican primary with 51 percent of the vote while in the Democratic primary, Congressman Ed Markey defeated fellow congressman Stephen Lynch 57 percent to 43 percent.

If you're experiencing deja-vu you may not be alone. The 2010 special senate election, in which Republican Scott Brown surprised just about everyone to win what was then referred to as "The Ted Kennedy Seat," was clearly on the minds of Democrats at the Markey victory party on Tuesday night.  Senator Elizabeth Warren sounded the alarm: "three years ago, we know what happened--we know what's at stake."

So what can we expect over the next eight weeks of campaigning? We take a closer look.

Guests

Fred Bever, WBUR Reporter

Rob Gray, Republican analyst; founder and president of Gray Media

Susan Tracy, Former Democratic State Representative; current president of The Strategy Group

This segment aired on May 1, 2013.

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