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The (Gardener's) Horror After The Storms06:12
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Weeping trees especially struggled under this year's historic snowfall. (Famartin/Wikimedia Commons)
Weeping trees especially struggled under this year's historic snowfall. (Famartin/Wikimedia Commons)

The snow is nearly all gone and temperatures are creeping into the 60s. But winter is still high in the minds of gardeners who are getting a late start on a whole mess of problems lying beneath the record snowfall.

Plows dumped mountains of the stuff onto shrubs, Japanese maples split under the weight of it and deer are moving into suburban gardens in search of something to eat.

Finally, gardeners are getting out and assessing the damage — and what to do about it.

Guest

Peter Mezitt, president of Weston Nurseries, which tweets @westonnurseries.

More

The Boston Globe: Winter's Lingering Toll Keeps Gardens Bogged Down

  • "At this time of year, the average backyard gardeners — eager for spring color — are stocking up on compost and filling planters with pansies. This year, they’re plodding into their soggy yards and taking sad inventory of the damage."

Radio Boston: My Poor Rhododendron! Answering Your Gardening Questions After A Long, Rough Winter

  • Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with a pair of gardening pros about winter’s toll on New England’s greenery and gets advice for worried gardeners.

This segment aired on April 13, 2015.

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