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The Future Of Women's Soccer After Another World Cup Victory

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United States' Carli Lloyd celebrates after scoring her third goal against Japan during the first half of the FIFA Women's World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
United States' Carli Lloyd celebrates after scoring her third goal against Japan during the first half of the FIFA Women's World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Going into the United States' World Cup final against Japan, Carli Lloyd was not exactly a household name. But then, she scored three goals — a hat trick — including a bold chip over the Japanese goal keeper from midfield.

The American women won 5-2, and Lloyd became an instant star.

The game drew 26.7 million viewers, the most for any soccer game on American television ever, and left the country buzzing about Lloyd and the rest of the team.

But there was also buzz about the inequities between men's and women's soccer in pay, resources, the way players were presented and whether this championship could be a catalyst for change.

Guests

Shira Springer, reporter and women's sports columnist for The Boston Globe. She tweets @ShiraSpringer

Bill Littlefield, host of NPR's Only A Game. He tweets @OnlyAGameNPR

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The Boston Globe: Women's Cup Winner Paid $2m, Far Below Men's $35m

  • "For the United States, the women’s World Cup title capped a long, strange tournament played largely outside the country’s enthusiastic embrace."

Adweek: How The National Women's Soccer League Plans To Keep You Hooked After The World Cup

  • "'We had over 50 players from 10 countries representing the NWSL at the World Cup,' [commissioner of the National Women's Soccer League Jeff Plush] said before Sunday's stirring win. 'The key thing is making sure the marketplace understands that so many of these players are playing in our league.'"

The Boston Globe: Why Do Fans Ignore Women's Pro Sports?

  • "In the race for Boston sports fans’ affections and dollars and for media and sponsor attention, the men’s teams enjoy a decades-long headstart. Or, as [Boston Breakers general manager Lee] Billiard says, 'it’s a constant battle, and it’s a battle that we’re never going to win. But we can put up a good fight, and we can do better than what we’re doing right now.'"

This segment aired on July 8, 2015.

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