Radio Boston Radio Boston

Support the news

Who Has Access To Your Data? Critics Say New Cybersecurity Bill Goes Too Far06:47
Download

Play
In February, President Barack Obama spoke at a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection. (Evan Vucci/AP)
In February, President Barack Obama spoke at a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection. (Evan Vucci/AP)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Your personal data is about to get a little less personal. Last week, the Senate passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA. The bill's stated purpose is to prevent cyberattacks, but critics say it goes too far when it comes to sharing consumer information.

Guest

Hiawatha Bray, technology writer for the business section of The Boston Globe. He’s also author of the book, “You Are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves.” He tweets @GlobeTechLab.

More

The Boston Globe: Proposed Cyberlaw Gives Feds Too Much Access To Our Data

  • "CISA will encourage companies hit by online criminals to share data with the US government, federal investigators, in order to devise better defenses. But it could also deliver sensitive data on millions of Americans to the same intelligence agencies that for years have secretly tracked our cellphone calls and monitored our Google searches."

The Washington Post: Apple And Dropbox Say They Don’t Support A Key Cybersecurity Bill, Days Before A Crucial Vote

  • "Apple and Dropbox said Tuesday that they do not support a controversial cybersecurity bill that, according to critics, would give the government sweeping new powers to spy on Americans in the name of protecting them from hackers. The announcement by the two companies comes days before the Senate expects to vote on the legislation, known as the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA."

This segment aired on November 5, 2015.

Support the news