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Boston’s Museum Of Science Takes On ‘The Science Behind Pixar’

Ed Catmull, president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, plays with an interactive lighting display in the Museum of Science exhibit "The Science Behind Pixar." (Courtesy Ashley McCabe)
Ed Catmull, president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, plays with an interactive lighting display in the Museum of Science exhibit "The Science Behind Pixar." (Courtesy Ashley McCabe)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Twenty years ago, Pixar Animation Studios released the first-ever, computer-animated feature film, "Toy Story." Until then, it was Walt Disney who had defined film animation: pictures drawn by hand, and filmed in rapid succession. But computer technology brought a sea-change to the art of animation, and a new exhibit at the Museum of Science in Boston, "The Science Behind Pixar," shows how science and technology have revolutionized the industry.

We recently toured the exhibit with Ed Catmull, the co-founder of Pixar and president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios. Catmull explained how Pixar's characters are brought to life — from idea, to modeling, to the use of mathematical models that power the computer animation to create simulated water, light, hair and movement on the screen.

"The Science Behind Pixar" is on view at the Museum of Science in Boston until January 10, 2016.

This conversation originally aired on July 6, 2015.

Guest

Ed Catmull, co-founder of Pixar and president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios.

This segment aired on December 9, 2015. The audio for this segment is not available.

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