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The New Bostonians: How Immigrants Revitalized Boston14:48
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Boston's Chinatown has traditionally been an enclave for Chinese immigrants, but rising rents are beginning to push out residents. (WBUR)
Boston's Chinatown has traditionally been an enclave for Chinese immigrants, but rising rents are beginning to push out residents. (WBUR)
This article is more than 3 years old.

A new report by the Boston Redevelopment Authority says over 25 percent of Bostonians are now foreign-born, an increase of nearly 20 percent since 2000. The Dominican Republic has now passed China as the top country of origin for Boston's foreign-born at 13 percent.

According to the BRA, these Bostonians are crucial to Boston's growth, contributing dollars and jobs to the city.

But that's been the case for decades, according to Marilynn Johnson, history professor at Boston College and author of "The New Bostonians: How Immigrants Have Transformed The Metro Area Since the 1960s." In her book, she explains how the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 and the immigrants who followed, effectively shaped Boston's current economy and culture.

As she writes, "Although often told as a story of corporate restructuring, technological innovation and elite-led gentrification, Boston's metropolitan transformation required a far broader cast of characters."

Guest

Marilynn Johnson, history professor at Boston College and author of "The New Bostonians: How Immigrants Have Transformed The Metro Area Since the 1960s."

More

WBUR: Report: Boston’s Foreign-Born Population Has Increased 19 Percent Since 2000

  • "The Dominican Republic has surpassed China as the top country of origin for Boston’s foreign-born, with Haiti the third-largest source. Thirteen percent of Boston’s foreign-born population came from the Dominican Republic, topping the 10.6 percent that came from China, per the report."

This segment aired on December 22, 2015.

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