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Littlefield On Sports: Peyton Manning's Retirement05:24
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Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning announced his retirement from pro football this weekend at an emotional press conference. (David Zalubowski/AP)
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning announced his retirement from pro football this weekend at an emotional press conference. (David Zalubowski/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

This weekend, Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning announced his retirement in an emotional press conference. Manning goes out on top, having led the Broncos to victory in this year's Super Bowl. It was his second Super Bowl win.

Bill Littlefield stops by to talk about Peyton Manning's legacy, Maria Sharapova's admission that she failed a drug test at the Australian Open and the Boston College women's hockey team's undefeated record.

Guest

Bill Littlefield, host of NPR’s Only A Game, which tweets @OnlyAGameNPR.

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The New York Times: Void Left By Peyton Manning May Be Larger For N.F.L. Than For Broncos

  • "Manning, who retired Monday after 18 seasons, including a final one marred by injury, more than accumulated a passel of records and two Super Bowl wins. He transcended the game the way few players have. Jim Brown, Joe Namath, Roger Staubach, Joe Montana and John Elway — Manning’s boss on the Broncos — were all hugely popular in their day, though largely for their success on Sundays. Manning, though, became a pop icon thanks to his many product endorsement deals, his ability to poke fun at himself on comedy shows like 'Saturday Night Live' and, coincidentally, the growth of the Internet, which fueled his popularity faster than it would have even a few years earlier, when fans got most of their information from television and newspapers."

The Boston Globe: Maria Sharapova Accused Of 'Negligence,' Ignoring Warnings Of Ban

  • "Maria Sharapova was guilty of 'willful negligence' for using meldonium, and international tennis officials were aware that many players were taking the drug before it was banned this year, former World Anti-Doping Agency president Dick Pound said Wednesday. Pound told The Associated Press that Sharapova could face a ban of up to four years unless she can prove mitigating circumstances to explain her positive test for meldonium at the Australian Open in January."

This segment aired on March 9, 2016.

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