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Massachusetts GOP: Is The Delegate Selection Process 'Crooked'?06:55
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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a New York primary night campaign event, Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a New York primary night campaign event, Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Donald Trump's big win last night further consolidated his position as the Republican front-runner. But he still does not have a lock on the nomination. That's because it's far from certain that he can win those 1,237 delegates before this summer's convention.

It's why Trump calls it a "rigged system," as he did again Tuesday night after New York's primary.

Last month, Trump won big here, trouncing Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who finished a distant fourth. And yet, Cruz is poised to have the most Massachusetts supporters at the Republican convention. Why? Well, because those are the rules set by the state GOP.

Guest

Alex Kingsbury, deputy ideas editor for The Boston Globe. He tweets @AlexKingsbury.

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The Boston Globe: The GOP’s ramshackle nomination process

  • "As the party chooses the actual individuals to serve as delegates, Cruz supporters and other Bay State Republicans are maneuvering to get their followers installed as Trump delegates. Those delegates would be formally required to back Trump on the first ballot, but then could abandon him if no candidate wins a majority and the convention moves to a second round of voting."

The Boston Globe: Battle for Mass. GOP convention delegates intensifies

  • "Backers of both Cruz and Trump, as well as unaffiliated party insiders, say privately they expect party leaders to work behind the scenes to deprive Trump of delegates — beyond those required by party rules. But whether the alternative is Cruz or someone who has not yet emerged is unknown."

WBUR: Analysis: Republican Delegate Rules Mean Trump Could Still Lose Mass.

  • "Beyond that pledge, however, there is no requirement that a delegate be loyal to a given candidate beyond that first ballot. That means that a John Kasich supporter could be elected as a “pledged” delegate for Trump, or vice versa."

Radio Boston: A History Of The GOP From Lincoln To The Tea Party

  • "There’s a war going on for the soul of the Republican party. At the latest skirmish was Saturday night’s GOP presidential debate in South Carolina, it was Cruz versus Rubio, Bush versus Trump, Trump versus everybody."

This segment aired on April 20, 2016.

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