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CommonHealth: The World Of DIY 'Brain Hacking'07:30
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In this 2014 file photo, Ann Carroll fits nodes to Sarah Beth Spitzer’s forehead in preparation for transcranial direct current stimulation testing at the Center for Brain Science at Harvard University. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
In this 2014 file photo, Ann Carroll fits nodes to Sarah Beth Spitzer’s forehead in preparation for transcranial direct current stimulation testing at the Center for Brain Science at Harvard University. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Electrical brain stimulation is said to help with all sorts of things — from anxiety to improved memory and better focus. Some people are so convinced of its benefits that they're doing it themselves in a practice known as "brain hacking."

Neuroscientists, though, say that the practice may be risky. Not because of what we know, but what we don't know.

Guest

Carey Goldberg, editor of WBUR's CommonHealth blog. She tweets @commonhealth.

This segment aired on July 11, 2016.

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