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When Mass. Bureaucrats Find Themselves On An Islamic State 'Hit List'08:30
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ISIS has become well known for its aggressive social media strategy, which includes a downloadable Twitter app that automatically posts pro-ISIS tweets, such as the above photo, to users' feeds (Kehald_10/Twitter).
ISIS has become well known for its aggressive social media strategy, which includes a downloadable Twitter app that automatically posts pro-ISIS tweets, such as the above photo, to users' feeds (Kehald_10/Twitter).
This article is more than 4 years old.

Last week, more than 100 Massachusetts government employees -- mostly anonymous bureaucrats -- learned their names had appeared in an unexpected place: on an Islamic State "hit list."

ISIS cyber-affiliates have released a number of similar lists in other states over the last few months — naming police officers, county board members, even ordinary citizens seemingly chosen at random — along with messages urging followers to target those individuals.

Gov. Charlie Baker says the Massachusetts list -- which contains the names of 138 state employees mostly employed in fiscal, budgetary and human resources departments -- does not pose a credible threat to anyone on the list and notes that no one on any previous list has been killed.

Still, at least one state official whose name appeared on the list tells the Globe his local police department is providing him with some extra security as a precaution.

What kind of threat do these lists pose — if any?

Guest

Max Abrahms, professor of political science at Northeastern University and a member at the Council on Foreign Relations. He tweets @MaxAbrahms.

This segment aired on July 25, 2016.

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