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Social Media Is Allowing Presidential Candidates To Connect With Voters, Take Aim At Each Other14:55
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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a cell phone photo with a woman in the audience after speaking at campaign event at John Marshall High School in Cleveland, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a cell phone photo with a woman in the audience after speaking at campaign event at John Marshall High School in Cleveland, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

Mike Pence is campaigning in Manchester Thursday. Meanwhile, the man at the top of the ticket tweeted earlier today:

The Twitterverse was confused. The Washington Post posted this headline "Donald Trump just called himself ‘Mr. Brexit,’ and nobody really knows why." They then offered the interpretation that the UK surprised the world by voting to leave the European Union, despite polling that indicated otherwise. So, perhaps Mr. Trump is saying he'll surprise the world the same way in November.

Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton tweeted:

She's striking a provocative personal tone which, of course, Donald Trump does frequently as well.

The point is, we are in an era where social media is driving political narrative. It's transforming how elections are conducted. So, what effect is that having on our democracy?

Guests

Nicco Mele, director of the Shorenstein Center of Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He tweets @nicco.

Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research at the Pew Research Center. She tweets @asmitch.

This segment aired on August 18, 2016.

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