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Admitting Women To Elite Universities

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At a co-educational week in 1969 at Princeton University, Pat Swinney, junior from Sweet Briar College, Va., changes the sign on a bathroom door. (AP Photo)
At a co-educational week in 1969 at Princeton University, Pat Swinney, junior from Sweet Briar College, Va., changes the sign on a bathroom door. (AP Photo)

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, many of the all-male elite universities in the U.S. and U.K. began admitting women.

Those decisions were not the product of a grass-roots effort by women to have equal access to the best schools or of university administrators and faculty committed to a broader mission of inclusive education.

Rather, it was a shrewd business decision to remain attractive to the brightest male high school students, who wanted women in the classroom.

Guest

Nancy Weiss Malkiel, professor emeritus at Princeton University and retired Dean of Princeton College. Author of “‘Keep the Damned Women Out’: The Struggle for Coeducation.”

This segment aired on October 10, 2016.

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