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Were Jurors In The Meningitis Outbreak Case Unanimous?12:05
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Barry Cadden arriving at the federal courthouse in Boston for closing arguments in his trial in March. (Steven Senne/AP)
Barry Cadden arriving at the federal courthouse in Boston for closing arguments in his trial in March. (Steven Senne/AP)
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There has been a twist in the federal trial of Barry Cadden, the Massachusetts pharmacist at the center of a deadly outbreak of fungal meningitis that infected hundreds and killed at least 60 people.

In March, a jury convicted Cadden of racketeering and mail fraud, but they found him not guilty of the most serious charge: second-degree murder, which could have meant a life sentence.

But closer examination of the jury verdict form shows they may not have been unanimous in their verdicts, as federal court requires. And that, say a former federal judge, lawyers and former prosecutors, is unprecedented.

Guest

David Boeri, WBUR senior reporter. He tweets at @davidboeri.

This segment aired on May 15, 2017.

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