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What Is An Obstruction Of Justice? Judge Gertner Explains06:46
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FBI Director James Comey listens during a news conference announcing a deal between the U.S. government and French bank BNP Paribas at the Justice Department in Washington, Monday, June 30, 2014. The U.S. government and French bank BNP Paribas have agreed to a settlement over alleged sanctions violations that would require the bank to plead guilty, pay almost $9 billion in penalties and face other sanctions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
FBI Director James Comey listens during a news conference announcing a deal between the U.S. government and French bank BNP Paribas at the Justice Department in Washington, Monday, June 30, 2014. The U.S. government and French bank BNP Paribas have agreed to a settlement over alleged sanctions violations that would require the bank to plead guilty, pay almost $9 billion in penalties and face other sanctions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Former FBI director James Comey is expected to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday.

Among the questions swirling: Whether President Trump asked Comey to end the FBI investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

If true, many Democrats say that amounts to obstruction of justice.

But what qualifies as an obstruction of justice? And where is the line between the inappropriate, and the illegal?

Guest

Nancy Gertner, former Massachusetts federal judge, senior lecturer on law at Harvard Law School and WBUR legal analyst.

This article was originally published on June 06, 2017.

This segment aired on June 6, 2017.

Kathleen McNerney Twitter Senior Producer / Editor, Edify
Kathleen McNerney is senior producer/editor of Edify.

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Meghna Chakrabarti Twitter Host, On Point
Meghna Chakrabarti is the host of On Point.

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