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Michelle Carter Trial: What Happens Now?25:30
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Michelle Carter stands as court is in recess at the end of the day on June 12 earlier in her trial in Taunton, Mass. (Faith Ninivaggi/The Boston Herald via AP)
Michelle Carter stands as court is in recess at the end of the day on June 12 earlier in her trial in Taunton, Mass. (Faith Ninivaggi/The Boston Herald via AP)
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Where do we draw the line between words and physical harm?

That's what we're left wondering after the verdict in the Michelle Carter trial, announced last Friday. Twenty-year-old Carter was convicted of involuntary manslaughter for encouraging her friend to commit suicide in a series of texts.

In his decision, Judge Lawrence Moniz cited the fact that Carter texted Conrad Roy III to "get back in" after he had left the truck where he planned to kill himself with carbon monoxide.

Guest

Nancy Gertner, former Massachusetts federal judge, senior lecturer on law at Harvard Law School and WBUR legal analyst. She tweets @ngertner.

This segment aired on June 19, 2017.

Nancy Gertner Cognoscenti contributor
Judge Nancy Gertner was appointed to the bench in 1994 by President Bill Clinton, and retired in September of 2011 to join the faculty of Harvard Law School. Her autobiography, "In Defense of Women: Memoirs of an Unrepentant Advocate," was published in 2011.

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Meghna Chakrabarti Twitter Host, On Point
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Alison Bruzek Twitter Associate Producer, Radio Boston
Alison Bruzek was a producer for Radio Boston.

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