Support the news

Why More Jobs and Education Haven't Decreased Poverty06:31
Download

Play
Lake High School graduates throw their caps into the air, Tuesday, June 8, 2010, at Owens Community College in Perrysburg, Ohio. (J.D. Pooley/AP)
Lake High School graduates throw their caps into the air, Tuesday, June 8, 2010, at Owens Community College in Perrysburg, Ohio. (J.D. Pooley/AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

Since the 1970s, millions more have entered the American workforce and there are nearly three times the number of college graduates. But, the overall poverty rate has remained stagnant, totaling between 11 and 15 percent for the past 40 years.

Ignoring taxes and government-spending programs, Europe has a similar poverty rate to the United States - around 20 percent. But, after accounting for welfare and transfer programs, the total poverty rate in Europe drops to below 10 percent. Evan Horowitz argues that increasing social spending could help solve the poverty problem in the United States.

Guest

Evan Horowitz, policy writer for The Boston Globe. He tweets @globehorowitz.

This segment aired on July 18, 2017.

Related:

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news