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New WBUR Poll Shows Gov. Baker Remains Popular In Mass., While President Trump Does Not10:03
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President Donald Trump holds up an executive order after signing it at the American Farm Bureau Federation annual convention Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn., as, from left, Rep. Diane Black, R-Tenn., Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., applaud (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
President Donald Trump holds up an executive order after signing it at the American Farm Bureau Federation annual convention Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn., as, from left, Rep. Diane Black, R-Tenn., Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., applaud (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
This article is more than 3 years old.

The beginning of 2018 means the beginning of another year. And in Massachusetts, it means a gubernatorial election. Currently, Republican incumbent Charlie Baker will take on one of three declared Democrats.

But in a blue-leaning state, where President Trump lost to Democrat Hillary Clinton by two-to-one margins, what could this mean for both the gubernatorial and national elections?

Guest

Anthony Brooks, WBUR Senior Political Reporter. He tweets @anthonyqbrooks.

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