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Meeting Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Doughty, and a BPS lawsuit

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This is the Radio Boston rundown for March 29. Anthony Brooks is our host.

  • We start today with politics, and the race for governor of Massachusetts. Governor Charlie Baker shocked political watchers a few months ago when he announced he would not run for re-election. Since then, we've been meeting the candidates who hope to succeed him. That includes two Democrats: Attorney General Maura Healey and State Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz, and two Republicans: former State Rep Geoff Diehl, and now, Wrentham businessman Chris Doughty. Doughty believes he can be the next Republican to win the top office in this traditionally blue state, and he joins us to tell us why. We also get analysis from POLITICO reporter and Massachusetts Playbook author Lisa Kashinsky.
  • As the Boston Public School District searches for its fifth superintendent in less than a decade, and the state mulls a possible takeover, we talk with two guests who support a different approach to addressing the inequities within BPS. David Scharfenberg, staff writer for the Boston Globe Ideas section, a graduate of Boston Public Schools and currently a Boston Public Schools parent, and Iván Espinoza-Madrigal, executive director of Lawyers for Civil Rights, join us to talk about how bringing a desegregation lawsuit against the district would work legally speaking, and why they think it would accomplish real, lasting change in the district.
  • Eight years ago, Conrad Roy died by suicide after filling his truck with lethal carbon monoxide. Later, his then-girlfriend, Michelle Carter, would be found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in a landmark case that investigated text message exchanges between the young couple, in which Carter encouraged Roy to go through with taking his life. The incident is now the subject of a Hulu docu-drama, which premiered today. In light of the premiere, we revisit a segment we did on another documentary about the case in 2019.

This program aired on March 29, 2022.

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