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Stonehill Degree Error Snarls Yahoo CEO In ‘ResumeGate’

For nearly a week, a growing controversy over embellished academic credentials has snarled Yahoo and its CEO, Scott Thompson.

Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson, in a 2010 file photo (AP)

Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson, in a 2010 photo (AP)

The academic record in question? It’s from Stonehill College, in Easton.

Here’s a recap of what’s transpired: On Thursday, escalating its attempt to shake up Yahoo’s board, the hedge fund Third Point alleged that Thompson had falsified his resume, according to DealBook. Third Point said Thompson’s resume included a bachelor’s degree from Stonehill in accounting and computer science, when the CEO only received a degree in accounting. According to Third Point, Stonehill said it did not award degrees in computer science when Thompson attended, and only had one such course available then.

Third Point’s allegations were soon proven true.

Since — in what Dealbreaker called “ResumeGate” — Yahoo has apologized for the “inadvertent error,” admitted that the director in charge of hiring Thompson also had errors on her academic record, and formed a committee to investigate Thompson’s hiring.

Third Point’s founder, Daniel Loeb, on Wednesday again called for Thompson to be replaced.

Third Point owns 5.8 percent of Yahoo’s shares, and has been waging a proxy battle for Yahoo’s stewardship for months.

As of this writing, Yahoo’s stock is down nearly 1 percent since its Thursday open.

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  • Ford Chillins

    It’s funny to hear so many Yahoo employees making these judgements of ethics when they really don’t have any. The thing is, all of Yahoo is part of a huge lie. That lie is the total and complete misrepresentation of their photo sharing social network, Flickr. For over 7 years Yahoo has gotten away with misrepresenting Flickr as something it’s not. What’s more, all the media, and politicians using the platform for PR have been a big part of the lies that forfeit any opinions being expressed condeming Thompson’s ongoing fib.

    This is because on the outside, Yahoo’s Flickr is presented to the public as a work-safe, family friendly place to let anyone 13 and up share photos with others. The real truth is, that under the charade created by slick algorithms and ongoing PR malarky, Flickr is a huge pron site hosting tons of people that share that adult content knowingly with children, without much suspicion by anyone.

    Obama, Romney, and a slew of others like most of the Texas government have no problem with the fact that this gross misrepresentation has afforded Yahoo’s Flickr the right to bypass filtering and flow right into grade schools and libraries, and most of all, into homes of trusting parents, fooled into thinking Flickr is safe. 

    Only one person has ever come out and called Flickr what it really is. That is Nicholas Carlson of Business Insider. His article last year tells the real truth. Nobody here will share that truth with you, so they are part of the lie too.

    • Rday

       >> like most of the Texas government have no problem with the fact that
      this gross
      >> misrepresentation has afforded Yahoo’s Flickr the right to
      bypass filtering and flow
      >>right into grade schools and libraries, and
      most of all, into homes of trusting parents,
      >>fooled into thinking Flickr
      is safe.

      I don’t know where you’re getting your information, but Flickr is blocked at the district where I work.  I know of others that have the same situation, so perhaps someone’s been blowing smoke in your…. ear.

  • Guest

    FIRE HIM !!!!   Then, he will have time to go finish his degree. A study of topics like Intellectual Property might be good.

  • Guest

    FIRE HIM !!!! Then, he will have time to finish his collegiate degree. May I suggest studying Intellectual Property, as one example.  

  • Guest

     This goes on all the time and many, many people
    get away with it and are rewarded for doing this. I still remember the serious
    “embellishment” that occurred in the 2004 Siemens Science
    Competition. In this case the winning project was neither “an out of the
    box breakthrough”, nor a “new technology” (as claimed). Never
    the less, even after this became known, it was covered up by all involved,
    including the news media, which should have reported on it but chose not too
    … welcome to Harvard! 

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