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Elizabeth Warren Sworn In As First Female Senator From Mass.

Vice President Joe Biden administers the oath of office to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who’s accompanied by her husband, Bruce Mann, during a mock swearing in ceremony on Capitol Hill Thursday. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Vice President Joe Biden administers the oath of office to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who’s accompanied by her husband, Bruce Mann, during a mock swearing in ceremony on Capitol Hill Thursday. (Cliff Owen/AP)

WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she’s going apartment hunting Friday. She says she wants to live within walking distance of her new office — the U.S. Capitol.

It was an ebullient Warren who appeared Thursday in a conference room borrowed from her new colleague, Democrat Charles Schumer, of New York, for interviews. Gone was the weariness from the long months of the campaign. It was replaced with energy and good humor.

When asked where she would be working, she laughed.

“No place,” she replied. “No, that’s not quite right. We’ve got a little temporary office. The offices will be reassigned. I’m trying to learn that this world now works on ‘Senate Standard Time.’ So I’ll learn.”

It was a day for Warren to recall her long road to becoming the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts. She brought a Bible she received in the third grade and has used ever since.

“She’ll be right up there with Teddy, in my opinion. She’s that much of a real deal.”
– Leo Fahey, Warren supporter

“It’s a pretty old Bible, and I guess that’s why it’s got nicks and dings all over it,” she said.

It’s a King James Bible, from which she’s been known to quote.

“Oh, I do,” she said. “I confess, I’m a King James fan. I understand the world has moved on, but for me it’ll always be with King James.”

The Bible reappeared in the Old Senate Chamber, where Vice President Joe Biden swore in each freshman senator.

“You’re going to put your left hand on the Bible and raise that right hand if you would,” Biden told Warren.

Immediately after swearing Warren in, Biden reminded her that she once gave him hell when she pushed for stronger regulations of the financial industry. This time, they laughed.

For the hundreds of supporters who traveled to Washington to celebrate Warren’s swearing-in, it was a historic moment. Warren had reserved the grand Kennedy Caucus Room, named after the three Kennedy brothers who served in the Senate, to greet her supporters. Leo Fahey, business manager of the Pipefitters Local in Boston, was among them.

“She’ll be right up there with Teddy, in my opinion,” Fahey said, referring to the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. “She’s that much of a real deal. Absolutely, I love her to death.”

Because she mobilized small donors across the country and eager volunteers throughout Massachusetts, Warren could make a difference in the next Senate race to replace John Kerry if he’s confirmed as secretary of state. But unlike Kerry, Vicki Kennedy and the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, Warren stopped short of endorsing Rep. Ed Markey, of Malden.

“I think he would make a great senator, but we gotta see what unfolds,” Warren said.

She declined to endorse anyone.

“Not at this moment,” she said. “Let’s see what happens.”

Many people in Washington, Massachusetts and around the country are waiting to see what Warren makes happen now that she has a chance.

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