The Associated Press

White House: Mass. Education, Military Funding At Risk From U.S. Budget Cuts

BOSTON — The White House says Massachusetts could lose tens of millions of dollars for education, environmental protection and child care if automatic federal budget cuts take effect as scheduled.

The Obama administration says Massachusetts would lose about $14 million (PDF) for primary and secondary education, putting 190 teacher and aide jobs at risk. About 20,000 fewer students would be served and 60 fewer schools would receive money from Washington.

About 7,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $43.4 million.

And Massachusetts would lose about $300,000 in grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention, corrections, drug treatment and enforcement and crime victim initiatives.

The budget cuts are set to take effect on Friday unless President Obama and Congress agree on an alternate plan.

Among funding Massachusetts stands to lose:

EDUCATION:

  • About $13.9 million for primary and secondary education, putting 190 teacher and aide jobs at risk.
  • About $13.4 million for about 160 teachers, aides and staff who help children with disabilities.
  • Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for about 1,100 children.

ENVIRONMENT:

  • About $4 million in funding for clean water and air quality, and to prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste.
  • About $472,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

MILITARY:

  • About 7,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $43.4 million.
  • Army base operation funding would be cut by about $8 million.
  • Funding for Air Force operations would be cut by about $5 million.

LAW ENFORCEMENT:

  • About $300,000 to support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

JOBS:

  • About $787,000 for job search assistance, referral and placement, leaving about 26,970 fewer people to get the help and skills they need to find work.

PUBLIC HEALTH:

  • About $625,000 to help upgrade the state’s response to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological events would be lost.
  • About $1.7 million to help prevent and treat substance abuse.
  • About $201,000 in funding for vaccinations, leaving about 2,940 children without vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza, and Hepatitis B.

SENIORS:

  • About $535,000 to provide meals for seniors.
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  • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

    sounds like a drop in the bucket. lets get serious about cutting spending

  • maureendwinell

    What about cuts to foreign aid? We just gave Egypt a bunch of money and f-16s. What a joke this government has become.

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