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Snow To Make For Messy Morning Commute

David Epstein's Wednesday snowfall predictions, as of 6 a.m. Tuesday (Click to enlarge)

David Epstein’s Wednesday snowfall predictions, as of 6 a.m. Tuesday.

BOSTON — A winter storm is set to drop heavy snow across Massachusetts Wednesday, making for a messy morning commute.

Western parts of the state could see up to 12 inches of snow, with most of Massachusetts, including Boston, predicted to get 6 to 10 inches. Rain will mix in on the South Shore and Cape Cod, dropping predicted snowfall totals to 2 to 7 inches.

But meteorologist David Epstein says if the track of the storm changes even slightly, snow totals to the south could change significantly.

“The biggest potential change will be to areas south of Boston,” Epstein said. “If the storm tracks farther north or south, the snow amounts will change dramatically.”

Snow will begin falling between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. Wednesday, with most of the accumulation occurring between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m. “The Wednesday morning commute is going to be a mess,” Epstein said.

Most of the state is under a winter storm warning through 6 p.m. Wednesday, with the National Weather Service predicting difficult travel conditions and reduced visibility, especially in the morning.

Boston and Somerville have declared parking bans and cancelled school for Wednesday. A number of other school districts, including Worcester, have also cancelled classes.

State utility companies say this storm could bring more outages than other storms the state has experienced this season because of the type of snow.

“There is a chance because it’s that heavier, wetter snow in this weather event that we could see some more outages,” National Grid’s Jake Navarro said. “But we’re not expecting anything too widespread.”

The snow should wind down Wednesday afternoon and end by early evening. Thursday and Friday will turn mostly sunny with highs in the upper 20s and lower 30s.

There is the potential for another winter storm Sunday afternoon through Monday, but this far out, Epstein says, it is hard to predict how it will impact the state.

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